Library

Holmes Virtual Library

Below are a number of resources housed in our Virtual Library. Click on a category to scroll to available resources.

Online Books

 

 

 

Click the button below to search Destiny, the online catalog for Holmes. 

If you find a book you like, put it on hold. I can deliver it to your homeroom, or you can pick  it up from school. 

Username: R-number (no @rock. k12.nc.us)

Password: MMDDYYYY(birthday) r?

 

You can read online books through Sora. 

Username: R-number (no @rock. k12.nc.us)

Password: MMDDYYYY (birthday)r?

Here is a student tutorial video

 

You can read online books through Overdrive. 

Username: R-number (no @rock. k12.nc.us)

Password: MMDDYYYY (birthday)r?

Quoting and Paraphrasing

 

Quoting and paraphrasing are all different ways of including the ideas of others into your assignments. Quoting passages allows you to share the specific words and phrases of another author, while paraphrasing allows you to show your understanding and interpretation of a text. Either way, referring to outside sources makes your own ideas and your paper more credible. Also, properly quoting and paraphrasing are great ways to avoid plagiarism.

Quoting

  • involves copying short sentences or passages from the original text word-for-word

  • places copied wording within “quotation marks” 

  • includes an in-text citation using the expected formatting style (APA, MLA, etc.)

 

Paraphrasing

  • involves putting a section of a text into your own words

  • changes the words and phrasing of the original text, but keeps the original meaning of the text

  • includes an in-text citation using the expected formatting style (APA, MLA, etc.)

 

Quoting

Quoting is when you repeat an author's work word-for-word. Direct quotes are placed within quotation marks (" ") and are cited using an in-text citation using the expected formatting style (APA, MLA, etc.). For example (with an APA-formatted citation):

“The systematic development of literacy and schooling meant a new division in society, between the educated and the uneducated” (Cook-Gumperz, 1986, p. 27).

If you are quoting longer passages (more than 40 words), please see our Block Quotation guide.

 

Use a Quote…

  • when the author's words convey a powerful meaning

  • when you cannot possibly say the information any better

  • to introduce an author's position that you want to discuss

  • to support claims in your writing or provide evidence for the points you are making

 

How to Quote:

If you want to include a quotation into your writing, make sure to introduce, cite, and explain the quotation. This technique is known as the ICE method.

INTRODUCE

Introduce your quotes by stating the author’s last name, any necessary background information, and a signal verb. According to APA guidelines, signal verbs should be written in the past tense, while in MLA, signal verbs should be present tense.

For example (in APA):

As stated by Cormac McCarthy in his 2006 novel The Road: "You forget what you want to remember, and you remember what you want to forget" (p. 12).

CITE

Provide in-text citations in the expected formatting style for all quotes. Place every quotation between quotation marks     (" ") and copy the text word-for-word, including the text’s original punctuation and capital letters.

For help with citing properly, see

EXPLAIN

Make sure to explain your quotations. Provide explanation or insight as to why this quotation is important, or comment on the importance of the quotation. To help with your explanation, ask yourself the following questions:

  • What is this quote saying?

  • How does this information add to what I am trying to prove in this paragraph?

  • Why is it important to what I am saying? What is its significance?

  • What am I trying to show or prove with this information?

 

Never leave any room for interpretation. It is your responsibility as the writer to explain the quoted information for your reader.

Paraphrasing

Paraphrasing is when you point something in your own words. When you paraphrase, you keep the same meaning of the original text, but you use different words and phrasing to convey that meaning, and you cite the information using an in-text citation in the expected formatting style (APA, MLA, etc.). Look at the example below. 

Original Text: 

"At just 8.5 square miles, the Pacific island country of Nauru is one of the smallest countries in the world. The island was once rich in phosphate, but most of the resource has been mined, leaving damage to the environment behind. Nauru has a population of about 10,000 people."


Paraphrased Text:

Nauru is a Pacific island country that is only 8.5 square miles in area. It is one of the smallest countries on the planet and only about 10,000 people live there. Nauru has mined its once plentiful supply of phosphate. This has damaged the environment on the island.

Use Paraphrasing…

  • As another option to quoting

  • To rewrite someone else's ideas without changing the meaning

  • To express someone else's ideas in your own words

  • To support claims in your writing

 

How to Paraphrase:

  • Read the text carefully. Be sure you understand the text fully.

  • Put the original text aside and write your paraphrase in your own words. Consider each point of the original text, how could you rephrase it? Do not simply replace every third or fourth word of the original passage. Use a thesaurus to replace some words. 

  • Review your paraphrase. Does it reflect the original text but is in your own words and style? Did you include all the main points and essential information?

  • Include an in-text citation in the expected formatting style (APA, MLA, etc.)  

  • Explain why the paraphrased information is important. To do so, ask yourself the following questions:

    • What am I trying to show or prove with this information?

    • Why is it important to what I am saying? What is its significance?

    • How does this information add to what I am trying to prove in this paragraph?  

Research Databases

 

NC Wise Owl - K12 Source for Research Databases, E-Journals, Primary Sources, ebooks, and Magazine Subscriptions

Password - wiseowl20

CIA World Factbook -  It provides facts about every country in the world, including information about history, geography, transportation, and much more.

Core - is a multidisciplinary aggregator of open access research. It allows users to search more than 66 million open access articles. 

Educational Games

 

Free Video, Image, and Music Sources

 

Virtual  Tours

 

 

Photos for Class - These images are free and safe. They are also found in creative commons and have citations. 

Pixabay - High quality, free stock images and videos. 

Unsplash - freely usable images

Pics for Learning - copyright friendly photos that can be used in an educational setting

 

Black and White Clipart - Students can use up to 50 photos for free under the existing license.

Color Clipart - Students can use up to 25 photos for free under the existing license. 

School Clipart - Includes education specific images

Free Movie Archive - Download or listen to free movies, films, and videos

 

 

 

 

Free music archive - Find free music here. 

Pixabay Music - Large selection of genres, moods, and music

©2019 Rockingham County Schools. Proudly created by McConnell Group.

Holmes Middle School

211 N. Pierce Street

Eden, NC 

Phone:  (336) 623-9791

  • Facebook

Rockingham County Schools

511 Harrington Highway

Eden, North Carolina 27288

Phone:  (336) 627-2600  Fax:  (336) 627-2660

Superintendent's E-mail:  rshotwell@rock.k12.nc.us

  • Facebook - Black Circle
  • RCS Twitter